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A Leader’s Heart: 5 Questions You Should Ask Yourself

Healthy Leaders

A Leader’s Heart: 5 Questions You Should Ask Yourself

Charles StoneCharles Stone

The story of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37), one of Jesus’ most famous stories, describes the power of true love. In this story, Jesus contrasts those with big heads (the priest and the Levite who had heads full of Bible knowledge) with one who had a big heart, the Samaritan. This story also offers clues about leaders with big hearts. Read that passage and then ask yourself these five questions based on the story and evaluate your own leadership heart.

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  1. Do I serve others based on their needs or upon the potential value they may bring to my ministry or cause?

Historically, Jews and Samaritans hated each other. Yet, the Samaritan stopped and aided the man who had been robbed and left for dead.

  1. Am I willing to be inconvenienced in order to serve others?

The Samaritan had places to be, yet he was willing to be inconvenienced. He paid a price with his time and money because he didn’t view people as an inconvenience.

  1. When faced with an opportunity to serve another, do I use the excuse, “Somebody else will?”

Research has proven that when I have an opportunity to help someone if I think somebody else will help, the chances I will help drop precipitously. It’s called the bystander effect.

  1. Do I simply talk the talk or do I walk my talk? 

The priest and the Levite both were trained in the Scriptures, as are many Christian leaders today. They knew the right stuff but it didn’t affect their behavior. They talked it but didn’t walk it. Genuine love for God is less about what you know than what you do.

  1. Do I serve so much that I lose myself in the process?

In ministry, needs never go away and we can easily serve with few limits. The Samaritan served the man by the road and he kept healthy boundaries at the same time. He didn’t bring him back to his home nor did he obligate himself financially for the rest of his life. And after he took care of him, he continued on his journey.

John Maxwell is known for this saying:

People don’t care about how much you know until they know how much you care.

Great advice for Christian leaders.